#IAmInnovation Campaign Acknowledges Jaqualine Anaquod For Her Indigenous Research

Jaqueline Anaquod has made giving back to her Indigenous community a lifelong goal. Through her research at the University of Victoria, she is demonstrating the positive impacts of language on Indigenous health. She started working with researcher Carrie Bourassa in the CFI-funded Indigenous Community-Based Health Research Lab during her undergraduate studies at the First Nation's University of Canada.

Poster Presentation for CHIWOS at Canadian Association of Nurses in HIV/AIDS Care (CANAC)

I had the wonderful opportunity to have a poster presentation at the 2017 Canadian Association of Nurses in HIV/AIDS Care. The conference was wonderful and I had many great conversations promoting Indigenous community-based research methodologies. Also to provide insight to the wonderful work being done here in Saskatchewan. Thank you for the wonderful opportunity to present CANAC 2017. 

Wow, Congrats! Researchers from our Lab are Publishing a Book!!

Listing to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in Contemporary Society

PHOTO CREDIT: DEMETER PUBLISHING

PHOTO CREDIT: DEMETER PUBLISHING

We hope to be doing a book launch in Regina sometime soon! Stay tuned for details!!

Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in a Contemporary Society is a collection of stories, inspired by a wealth of experiences across space and time from a kokum, an auntie, two-spirit parents, a Metis mother, a Tlinglit/Anishnabe Métis mother and an allied feminist mother. This book is born out of the need to share experiences and story. Storytelling is one of the most powerful forms of passing on teachings and values that we have in our Indigenous communities. This book weaves personal stories to explore mothering practices and examines historical contexts and underpinnings that contribute to contemporary parenting practices. We share our stories with the hope that it will resonate with readers whether they are in the classroom or in the community. Like our contributors, we are from all walks of life, sharing diverse perspectives about mothering whether it be as a mother, auntie, kokum or other adopted role.

CHIWOS PAW Poster Presentation at CAHR 2017 in Montreal

Having the opportunity to be chosen to attend such a wonderful event. It gave me an opportunity to network and meet new people in the field of HIV/AIDS Health Research. More specifically the opportunity to share the CHIWOS PAW Environmental Scan's community based research and speak about Indigenous methodologies.  Big thank you to my partner in the poster presentation Eric Oleson for doing an outstanding job presenting.  

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Dr. Carrie Bourassa presented in Melbourne Australia

Tri-Nations Alliance Indigenous Workshop March 9th, 2017.

Dr. Carrie Bourassa presented on: 

Session 3: Embedding cultural competency and safety for Indigenous health into education & training and across the medical workforce:

-       What’s being done

-       Cultural competency and safety in the workplace; how can it be improved?

-       The successes and ongoing challenges

2017 Inspiring Leadership: The Strength Within

I (Jenna Tickell) was lucky to be invited to attend this conference on International Women's Day! Our lab runs on a mentorship model. The importance of mentorship stood out as the theme throughout the day. My favourite speaker was Liz Murray; she told her story, of how she went from being homeless to a Harvard graduate. Liz said: "Persist and when you get there, pull others along!" Liz emphasized that she did not reach this success on her own. She met someone who believed in her and encouraged her. Now looking back, she realized that he mentored her throughout her journey. He also encouraged her to step up and share her own mentorship skills, he said: "A long time ago someone stood up for someone, who stood up for someone else, who stood up for me. It's time for you to be that someone. Tag you're it!" Liz learned many things, throughout her journey to success. She explained how experiencing the death of her mother shattered how she experienced life from that point on. After that moment she realized: "There isn't really a 'later' for me anymore. I'm going to try my 'what if's' today, in this life, right now!" There is so much more to learn from her life story. I encourage you to watch the movie Homeless to Harvard or read her book called the Breaking Night.



Here are just some of the many empowering quotes that really resonated with me from the conference today!

"It's not our job to take on all of the worlds problems, our job is to do what we can!"

"We are not meant to have it all. We are not meant to be full of gratitude all the time because it's in the messy stuff that resilience grows."

"Let it be a life that has meaning and dignity for you."

"Meaning is something that you build into your life."

"The biggest struggle is getting past yourself."

"People are willing to help you, if you are willing to ask."

"There are good people out there, never stop believing in that."


Going to conferences like this, really gets me to reflect on my life and makes me appreciate it. Where I was, and the people along the way that have been by my side to support me along the way, the way to where I am now. I am truly blessed to work in a lab that honours women and respectful relationships. I couldn't quite figure out what it is that I loved most about my place of work, but I think I realize now, it's the safety, support, and mentorship, we reciprocate in this lab. We are all here for the same purpose; we want to see change in this world. I realize now why Carrie hired each and every one of us, because she saw in us what we may not have seen in ourselves. We are all committed to "doing what we can now", to aid towards de-colonizing our society, while simultaneously empowering Indigenous people, specific to our Indigenous women. Our resilience is strong; I do believe, together we have the tools to begin the healing process, of our people, for generations to come. 

Happy International Women's Day!!!

March 8th is International Women’s Day and on Treaty Four land in Fort Qu’Appelle I (Jessica Dieter, Community Research Assistant) attended the Qu’Appelle Safe Haven’s event to honour and celebrate being an Indigenous women and all the strength that comes from that.  This day was truly moving and brought me to some emotional moments as I heard women speak from the heart.  The day started with an opening prayer from elder Cecile Asham. It was then followed up with a session of Journey Dance with Michelle Brass.  This session allowed participants to use their bodies to feel the music and let what whatever movement to flow freely.  It was fun way to let loose and break a little sweat.  Next Erin Goodpipe-Ironstand shared her story with the crowd on “Dropping the Baggage of Intergenerational Trauma”.  After lunch the next speaker, Tala Tootoosis shared her story: “Be Strong, Be Fearless, Be Limitless”.  The last speaker was Chasity Delorme, her talk “The Water Within”.   Each story was unique, each painful and empowering in its own way.  It was an honour to hear these stories of loss, grief, healing, and hope for the future.  Each of the stories was tied back to the colonization and assimilation that Indigenous women have been resisting.  The t-shirts that the event gave out read, “We are rising strong and resilient” and the speakers really showed this to be true in their words, their laughs and tears.  The most beautiful part of the day, was a group of three young girls (Jordynn Delorme, Jayda Delorme, and Sadie Turningrobe) in beautiful ribbon skirts who sang Round dance songs in between speakers.  Their voices were beautiful, united and really showed the hope for the future.

A ceremony of celebration took place to honour Dr. Carrie Bourassa's appointment as the Scientific Director of CIHR-IAPH

We are so proud of our mentor Dr. Carrie Bourassa! 

She reaches for the stars, with lots of hard work and prayer, and achieves goals she does not even believe were attainable. She is humble, honourable and inspirational. Congratulations Carrie, you make us ever so proud!

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Carrie & Kookum Betty McKenna

Carrie & Kookum Betty McKenna

Carrie & Dr. Earl Nowgesic

Carrie & Dr. Earl Nowgesic

Carrie & Calvin Racette

Carrie & Calvin Racette

Carrie, Elder Hilda, Elder Dot & Kookum Betty McKenna

Carrie, Elder Hilda, Elder Dot & Kookum Betty McKenna

Welcome Dr. Janet McElhaney

Dr. McElhaney visited us from Sudbury. She is the: Vice President of Research & Scientific Director, Health Sciences North Research Institute Medical Lead for Seniors Care, Health Sciences North Consulting Geriatrician, Health Sciences North Health Sciences North Volunteer Association Research Chair in Healthy Aging Professor, Medical Sciences Division, Northern Ontario School of Medicine. It was a short but sweet visit. Our whole lab had the pleasure to go out for dinner with her the first night she arrived. Then Carrie and Jenna got to take her out to visit our community partners at All Nations Healing Hospital in Fort Qu'Appelle. We had a lovely tour of the All Nations Healing Hospital and White Raven. Warm regards and safe travels home to our new friend and associate. 

Walk for Alzheimer's

Jessica Dieter and Jenna Tickell raised money on behalf of our CCNA Dementia Project and participated in the Alzheimer's walk for awareness held at the University of Regina on January 29th 2017. 

"We are very proud to say that we exceeded our goal by raising a total of $625.00 for the Alzheimer's Society!" Jessica
"We are thankful for all of the work that the Alzheimer's Society does and look forward to seeing more Indigenous specific research in the future." Jenna
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On The Road Again

I'm (Jenna Tickell) off to Fort Qu'Appelle for the CCNA Dementia Project at the All Nation Healing Hospital with Jessica Dieter. I am very lucky to work alongside such an amazing Community Research Assistant. Jessica and I have allot of fun and we work a little too. Today we are leading one of many research focus groups with participants from the FHQTC community. 

AGEWELL Annual Conference

Again, I am so happy that I was able to attend another AGEWELL event - its 2016 Annual Conference in beautiful Montreal, Quebec.  INSPIRED by great thinkers and IMPRESSED by technological innovations for aging

HQP networking at Les Trois Brasseurs

HQP networking at Les Trois Brasseurs

Me and the Boss/Mentor/Supervisor at the HQP networking event on Tuesday night - Les Trois Brasseurs

Me and the Boss/Mentor/Supervisor at the HQP networking event on Tuesday night - Les Trois Brasseurs

Minute Madness - really!

Minute Madness - really!

Poster Presentation - ready to field the many questions that would come later that day and the next!

Poster Presentation - ready to field the many questions that would come later that day and the next!

The view from Hotel Bonaventure in beautiful downtown Montreal.

The view from Hotel Bonaventure in beautiful downtown Montreal.

Last day of the conference - the room is filled with innovators, caregivers, researchers.

Last day of the conference - the room is filled with innovators, caregivers, researchers.

#everychildmatters

On September 30th was orange t-shirt day in honour those who attended residential school. For the residential school survivors and for those who didn't make it home. I feel that it's important as a Indigenous person to participate in events such as this. Its these grass roots projects that really shows resiliency of our people. I didn't attend residential school but I am definitely impacted by it. My grandparents, my father, aunties, uncles, older cousins attended residential school and the unspeakable hurts they experienced had affected our family unit. Through all the hurts in time have each individually found their voices and culture again. I strongly believe that we as Indigenous people have our inherit right to our ancestral knowledge and we will continue to make strides as Indigenous warriors. 

http://orangeshirtday.weebly.com

The Data Collection Has Begun for our Dementia Project!

We went out to Fort Qu'Appelle & Peepeekisis First Nations a couple times this September. We were able to discuss the Ontario fact sheets, First Nations specific concerning dementia, with community members.

Hopefully, these conversations can help us understand what we need here in Saskatchewan, in the Qu'Appelle valley area specifically, concerning dementia amongst the rural/remote Indigenous peoples. 

I look forward to future work with these communities!

Jessica Dieter, Natalie Owl & Jenna Tickell

Jessica Dieter, Natalie Owl & Jenna Tickell