National Indigenous Day Celebrations

National Indigenous Day took place yesterday, on June 21st, 2018. Morning Star Lodge was pleased to have been in the community to celebrate Indigenous culture, language, arts, and people. We present highlights from the events that were taking place in our communities and are proud to continue serving them with our research now and in the future. 

Highlights from the event the Victoria Park and City Square Plaza event, hosted by the City of Regina and Aboriginal City Employees. The event featured traditional arts, music, and dance performances, and boutiques for attendees to purchase Indigenous arts and crafts. The event also featured an opening presentation from Morning Star Lodge's own Erin Goodpipe: 

 

 Teepee on display in Victoria Park, Regina, SK. (1)

Teepee on display in Victoria Park, Regina, SK. (1)

 Teepee on display in Victoria Park, Regina, SK. (2)

Teepee on display in Victoria Park, Regina, SK. (2)

 Performances by the  Creeland Dancers  and  Dallas & Phil Boyer.  (1)

Performances by the Creeland Dancers and Dallas & Phil Boyer. (1)

 Performances by the  Creeland Dancers  and  Dallas & Phil Boyer.  (2)

Performances by the Creeland Dancers and Dallas & Phil Boyer. (2)

 Itinerary of the event and sponsorship considerations.

Itinerary of the event and sponsorship considerations.

 Additional events hosted at  Casino Regina .

Additional events hosted at Casino Regina.

The other event that Morning Star Lodge staff attended was a community event held at Grassick Park, Regina, SK hosted by Circle ProjectReach, and the Indigenous Christian Fellowship. This free event for all included performances of traditional Indigenous dance, performances from Indigenous musicians for both traditional and non-traditional music, a free BBQ for all attendees, an Elder's village, and many other educational and family events to partake in. Below are some highlights of the event: 

 

 Traditional Dance Performance. (1)

Traditional Dance Performance. (1)

 Traditional Dance Performance. (2)

Traditional Dance Performance. (2)

 Traditional Dance Performance. (3)

Traditional Dance Performance. (3)

 Traditional Dance Performance. (4)

Traditional Dance Performance. (4)

 Traditional Dance Performance. (5)

Traditional Dance Performance. (5)

 Traditional drum-circle performance.

Traditional drum-circle performance.

 A display of flag and musical performances from Indigenous musicians.

A display of flag and musical performances from Indigenous musicians.

 Educational displays on Women's Traditional Dancing and the history of Treaty 4.

Educational displays on Women's Traditional Dancing and the history of Treaty 4.

 Educational displays on the Métis people and culture.

Educational displays on the Métis people and culture.

We at Morning Star Lodge sincerely hope that every one had a happy and safe National Indigenous Day, and that Indigenous culture, language, arts, and people are continued to be celebrated now and in the future.

Application + Action: The TRC Reading Guide for Non-Indigenous Organizations

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Morning Star Lodge is proud to present the Application + Action: The TRC Reading Guide for Non-Indigenous Organizations. This guide has been endorsed by our partners You may read the guide in it's entirety here

Additional Congress 2018 Information

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We have posted before about Morning Star Lodge's attendance at Congress of The Humanities and Social Sciences 2018, but now have new information about Morning Star Lodge's participation at the Congress of 2018 held at the University of Regina on May 26 to June 1, 2018. 

Congress 2018- May 27, 2018: As a founder of the aking Treaty our Collective, myself (Erin Goodpipe) and other collective members had the opportunity to present in the Espikenew series, a keynote series dedicated to the late Jo-Ann Episkenew. This year’s topic was women and their role as water protectors. My panels spoke about how our performance, aking Treat Four, used conceptual art to evoke the cultural idea of woman as central to the Nation, as voices for the people and the human metaphor for the life giving qualities that Mother Earth possesses. During this panel presentation, we spoke about the western counter narrative which traditionally excluded Indigenous women from history and attempted to denounce the woman’s voice as valuable and integral to her nation and culture. By using art, we strived to revalue and reclaim this narrative by showcasing specific performance pieces which showed Indigenous women in leadership, as fundamental in the survivance of tribal life and as representers and advocates for the land, sky, water and the life in between. This panel hoped to showcase that Indigenous woman must be affirmed and assert their role as protectors as Creator gave them the right to bear and nurture life. As they can only understand this right, only they can truly represent it.


The Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies (CACS) held a day long event titled, “Climate Change: Addressing Critical Issues In Today’s World.” For this event, myself, and five arts educators created a performative piece called “Food For Thought” that ngaged participants in the surroundings on Wascana lake. This was done in order to explore how ideas about “natural landscapes” and “connection to land” has been perverted by the colonial mission to consume and the impulse to justify and rationalize our engagement in destructive practices that engender unhealthy relationships across generations. During this performance, symbols of historical injustice to Indigenous people, land and climate were used to inspire dialogue amongst researchers, educators and the general public.

Starblanket Health Fair and Ceremony

Morning Star Lodge Staff were pleased to be in attendance of the Starblanket Health Fair, which took place on May 29th in at the Whitecalf Gym in Lebret, SK. The event saw approximately 40 people attending to learn about health prevention from various health agencies such as FHQ Health Services, White Raven Healing Centre, File Hills Health, YTC Child and Family Services, and Health Canada. Dementia Project members from Morning Star Lodge and community partners enjoyed a day of community outreach and interacting with the people of Starblanket.  

CICA Information Session

Morning Star Lodge's work continues with the Canadian Indigenous Assessment (CICA) Project via an informational session held on June 13th from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for 25 community members of the Carry the Kettle Nakoda Nation in attendance. These attendees consisted of seniors, Elders, and Indigenous women with an interest in culturally appropriate dementia care. 

Morning Star Lodge and community partner File Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council (FHQTC) spoke on the roles and responsibilities of CICA and provided a presentation on CICA's history. This presentation included the Australian-developed Kimberley Indigenous Cognitive Assessment (KICA) tool that CICA was developed from. A catered lunch was provided to community members as well as a discussion on what is expected from the project. 

 

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Objectives of the information session were to showcase the purpose of CICA, as well as sign up community members interested in the Nakoda Advisory Group. The Nakoda Advisory Group is to assist in the development of culturally appropriate dementia screening tools and care practices, as well as to adopt and translate Nakoda language into the CICA tool in a culturally safe and respectful environment. The goal was to sign up form 5-10 community members to the Nakoda Advisory Group. The staff of Morning Star Lodge are incredibly excited and proud that we have exceeded this goal as 17 community members have signed up to join the Nakoda Advisory Group. 

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 Community members in attendance of the CICA Information Session. Photographs courtesy of Louise BigEagle.

Community members in attendance of the CICA Information Session. Photographs courtesy of Louise BigEagle.

Regina North Central Smudge Walk

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Morning Star Lodge staff were among the over 100 people in attendance for Regina's North Central annual Smudge Walk on June 1st. The walk is a celebration of Indigenous culture, community, and prayer. Participants walked a perimeter around the North Central community and then convened in Dewdney Park for a community barbecue  and a showcase of local Indigenous talent. Sage for smudging was also provided to participants as a symbol of prayer and cleansing. 

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Congress of The Humanities and Social Sciences 2018

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Morning Star Lodge is proud to have joined the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2018, held at the University of Regina from May 26 to June 1, 2018. There were 70 academic associations from across Canada who converged at the University of Regina to showcase the leading research in history, education, theatre, language, and communication. The theme of Congress 2018 was “Gathering Diversities”, in which a major topic of discussion was social change, the importance of representation, and policy.

 

Morning Star Lodge presented their findings from the Water Economics, Policy, and Governance Network project in the Indigenous Literary Studies Association program and the Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes program. Elder Betty Mckenna provided the attendees with Traditional Knowledge and teachings of the importance of water and water protection to Indigenous culture in relation to Indigenous women. Danette Starblanket and Marlin Legare presented on water policy, water economics, and relevant topics affected by water governance such as the Idle No More movement. The sessions were both well attended.   

#IAmInnovation Campaign Acknowledges Jaqueline Anaquod For Her Indigenous Research

Jaqueline Anaquod has made giving back to her Indigenous community a lifelong goal. Through her research at the University of Victoria, she is demonstrating the positive impacts of language on Indigenous health. She started working with researcher Carrie Bourassa in the CFI-funded Indigenous Community-Based Health Research Lab during her undergraduate studies at the First Nation's University of Canada.

Poster Presentation for CHIWOS at Canadian Association of Nurses in HIV/AIDS Care (CANAC)

I had the wonderful opportunity to have a poster presentation at the 2017 Canadian Association of Nurses in HIV/AIDS Care. The conference was wonderful and I had many great conversations promoting Indigenous community-based research methodologies. Also to provide insight to the wonderful work being done here in Saskatchewan. Thank you for the wonderful opportunity to present CANAC 2017. 

Wow, Congrats! Researchers from our Lab are Publishing a Book!!

Listing to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in Contemporary Society

 PHOTO CREDIT: DEMETER PUBLISHING

PHOTO CREDIT: DEMETER PUBLISHING

We hope to be doing a book launch in Regina sometime soon! Stay tuned for details!!

Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in a Contemporary Society is a collection of stories, inspired by a wealth of experiences across space and time from a kokum, an auntie, two-spirit parents, a Metis mother, a Tlinglit/Anishnabe Métis mother and an allied feminist mother. This book is born out of the need to share experiences and story. Storytelling is one of the most powerful forms of passing on teachings and values that we have in our Indigenous communities. This book weaves personal stories to explore mothering practices and examines historical contexts and underpinnings that contribute to contemporary parenting practices. We share our stories with the hope that it will resonate with readers whether they are in the classroom or in the community. Like our contributors, we are from all walks of life, sharing diverse perspectives about mothering whether it be as a mother, auntie, kokum or other adopted role.

CHIWOS PAW Poster Presentation at CAHR 2017 in Montreal

Having the opportunity to be chosen to attend such a wonderful event. It gave me an opportunity to network and meet new people in the field of HIV/AIDS Health Research. More specifically the opportunity to share the CHIWOS PAW Environmental Scan's community based research and speak about Indigenous methodologies.  Big thank you to my partner in the poster presentation Eric Oleson for doing an outstanding job presenting.  

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Dr. Carrie Bourassa presented in Melbourne Australia

Tri-Nations Alliance Indigenous Workshop March 9th, 2017.

Dr. Carrie Bourassa presented on: 

Session 3: Embedding cultural competency and safety for Indigenous health into education & training and across the medical workforce:

-       What’s being done

-       Cultural competency and safety in the workplace; how can it be improved?

-       The successes and ongoing challenges

2017 Inspiring Leadership: The Strength Within

I (Jenna Tickell) was lucky to be invited to attend this conference on International Women's Day! Our lab runs on a mentorship model. The importance of mentorship stood out as the theme throughout the day. My favourite speaker was Liz Murray; she told her story, of how she went from being homeless to a Harvard graduate. Liz said: "Persist and when you get there, pull others along!" Liz emphasized that she did not reach this success on her own. She met someone who believed in her and encouraged her. Now looking back, she realized that he mentored her throughout her journey. He also encouraged her to step up and share her own mentorship skills, he said: "A long time ago someone stood up for someone, who stood up for someone else, who stood up for me. It's time for you to be that someone. Tag you're it!" Liz learned many things, throughout her journey to success. She explained how experiencing the death of her mother shattered how she experienced life from that point on. After that moment she realized: "There isn't really a 'later' for me anymore. I'm going to try my 'what if's' today, in this life, right now!" There is so much more to learn from her life story. I encourage you to watch the movie Homeless to Harvard or read her book called the Breaking Night.



Here are just some of the many empowering quotes that really resonated with me from the conference today!

"It's not our job to take on all of the worlds problems, our job is to do what we can!"

"We are not meant to have it all. We are not meant to be full of gratitude all the time because it's in the messy stuff that resilience grows."

"Let it be a life that has meaning and dignity for you."

"Meaning is something that you build into your life."

"The biggest struggle is getting past yourself."

"People are willing to help you, if you are willing to ask."

"There are good people out there, never stop believing in that."


Going to conferences like this, really gets me to reflect on my life and makes me appreciate it. Where I was, and the people along the way that have been by my side to support me along the way, the way to where I am now. I am truly blessed to work in a lab that honours women and respectful relationships. I couldn't quite figure out what it is that I loved most about my place of work, but I think I realize now, it's the safety, support, and mentorship, we reciprocate in this lab. We are all here for the same purpose; we want to see change in this world. I realize now why Carrie hired each and every one of us, because she saw in us what we may not have seen in ourselves. We are all committed to "doing what we can now", to aid towards de-colonizing our society, while simultaneously empowering Indigenous people, specific to our Indigenous women. Our resilience is strong; I do believe, together we have the tools to begin the healing process, of our people, for generations to come. 

Happy International Women's Day!!!

March 8th is International Women’s Day and on Treaty Four land in Fort Qu’Appelle I (Jessica Dieter, Community Research Assistant) attended the Qu’Appelle Safe Haven’s event to honour and celebrate being an Indigenous women and all the strength that comes from that.  This day was truly moving and brought me to some emotional moments as I heard women speak from the heart.  The day started with an opening prayer from elder Cecile Asham. It was then followed up with a session of Journey Dance with Michelle Brass.  This session allowed participants to use their bodies to feel the music and let what whatever movement to flow freely.  It was fun way to let loose and break a little sweat.  Next Erin Goodpipe-Ironstand shared her story with the crowd on “Dropping the Baggage of Intergenerational Trauma”.  After lunch the next speaker, Tala Tootoosis shared her story: “Be Strong, Be Fearless, Be Limitless”.  The last speaker was Chasity Delorme, her talk “The Water Within”.   Each story was unique, each painful and empowering in its own way.  It was an honour to hear these stories of loss, grief, healing, and hope for the future.  Each of the stories was tied back to the colonization and assimilation that Indigenous women have been resisting.  The t-shirts that the event gave out read, “We are rising strong and resilient” and the speakers really showed this to be true in their words, their laughs and tears.  The most beautiful part of the day, was a group of three young girls (Jordynn Delorme, Jayda Delorme, and Sadie Turningrobe) in beautiful ribbon skirts who sang Round dance songs in between speakers.  Their voices were beautiful, united and really showed the hope for the future.

A ceremony of celebration took place to honour Dr. Carrie Bourassa's appointment as the Scientific Director of CIHR-IAPH

We are so proud of our mentor Dr. Carrie Bourassa! 

She reaches for the stars, with lots of hard work and prayer, and achieves goals she does not even believe were attainable. She is humble, honourable and inspirational. Congratulations Carrie, you make us ever so proud!

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 Carrie & Kookum Betty McKenna

Carrie & Kookum Betty McKenna

 Carrie & Dr. Earl Nowgesic

Carrie & Dr. Earl Nowgesic

 Carrie & Calvin Racette

Carrie & Calvin Racette

 Carrie, Elder Hilda, Elder Dot & Kookum Betty McKenna

Carrie, Elder Hilda, Elder Dot & Kookum Betty McKenna